Keeping a Dog Tick-Free

December 27, 2010 by  
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Dogs and in general all pets tend to spend more of their summer time outdoors. In case of dogs, it is very important to be careful about parasites, bugs and micro organisms that can harm them while they get their whiff of fresh air. Precautions are necessary to keep these dangers away. One of these pests that can cause a lot of nuisance and damage are the ticks since they carry diseases. Avoiding the ticks is of prime importance than curing at a later stage.

Why Ticks?

Ticks tend to stick to warmer temperatures, CO2 and movement. Ticks do not transmit through the air. Their motion is limited to crawling. They transmit themselves by climbing up taller structures or plants and drop onto any living and moving human or animal. The danger of diseases or kinds of diseases transmitted by ticks depends upon the country and culture, therefore the cure of after effects of ticks and ticks itself varies from country to country. The danger of having ticks on your dogs body begins once the tick bites. The bite itself is painless and unfeeling but the place of bite might get infected in no time. Consulting a veterinarian is advisable for treatment which normally involves oral antibiotics. If your pet dog is diseased due to a tick bite, there is a risk of infection spreading due to your dog salivation on or biting another pet. The most popular disease spread by a tick bite is the lyme disease but not the only one.

How to keep ticks away from your pet dog

The best way to avoid ticks is to avoid walking your dog in the midst of vegetation during tick season. Always keep the vegetation around your house trimmed.  Certain preventive medication products are also available. More information can be gathered from your veterinarian about suitability of these to your dog in respect to age and area. Do not use medications without consulting and proper instructions must be followed in using this kind of medication. Please remember that these medications are suited for a single class of pets only, meaning that tick prevention medication for dogs is for dogs only and should not be used on cats or any other pets.

Removing Ticks

When your dog comes back from outdoors make sure to check him carefully for ticks. They are normally found in warm areas, under the arms, in the ears, between the toes and in the folds of the skin. If you find any, remove them safely. Do not touch the tick, use a alcohol swab, then pull it up slowly with tweezers. Make sure not to leave any parts of the tick sticking to your dog. If you are unsuccessful contact your vet.

Dogs and Your Lifestyle

December 27, 2010 by  
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For some these two notions might seem too far apart to present any similarities. But still, more than we know, dogs as object of our love or repulsion, affect our lifestyle.

Each and every one of us has gone through at least one experience that included a dog. Whether sad or fortunate, these experiences exist and cannot be ignored. As every other marking moment emotions triggered by a dog at some point influent our ways from that moment on.

Just for fun I want to show you what I mean by giving a rather unknown example to prove my point.

Let’s say you are over 30 and tried already every diet in the world to loose a few pounds. And naturally, nothing worked. Well, one evening, rainy evening of course, you come across a little fluffy puppy abandoned just next to the garbage can in front of your house. You don’t necessarily like dogs, but this one seems different and so alone, maybe even a little sick, that you feel pity (you think) for him and take him in…just for the night. And then you keep him another night, and another one till he officially becomes your pet – you can’t deny it anymore. You walk him every day at fixed hours and, although you forgot all about your weight problem being too busy petting the little pet, you amazingly reached undreamed results in that particular problem. Surprised?

You shouldn’t be, it’s known (by some at least) that regular 10 – 15 minute-walkis the best diet of all. Try them on your own and you might get bored and give up. But with a dog, the walks are a must, they have to be done, you can’t miss any of them.

So, the little innocent dog not only made you a better person since you let him into your house (and heart), but also solved the problem you had that all your determination and lost money on diet products couldn’t solve.

If I wasn’t convincing enough, just try it. Get a dog. And miraculously you will be a different person.

How Much Time Can Dogs Stay Alone?

December 27, 2010 by  
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If you are going to leave your dog alone for a long period of time then don’t be surprised with the behavior issues he might develop. Being alone, he deals with two big problems. The first one is the physic and emotional discomfort, because he sees he is free and he doesn’t know what he is allowed to do and what he isn’t. Sometimes stress is added because he is afraid of doing something that can get him punished. The second problem comes out of the need of a dog to be permanently around people or other dogs.

If it is a small dog, he should be familiarized to his environment. If a little dog is to be left alone the entire day, then make sure he has enough water and that a big part of the room he is left into will be covered in papers. A small dog needs to satisfy his physiological needs every three hours. Do not under any circumstances leave the dog locked in the doggy house without given him access to water. You should let him stay in a small room, for example the kitchen.

A good idea might be coming home in your lunch break or hiring someone to walk your dogs. This way he gets a chance to meet other people and dogs and help you prevent a home disaster.

Experts recommend to spend a few hours a day with your dog and introduce him to as many friends and neighbors as you can until he turns 7-12 weeks old, because at this age the puppy holds the capacity to understand some situations.

If you have an adult dog, that needs to be fed only once a day, it is simplier. The dog will eat at night or in the evening when you get home. You will walk him in the morning and when you get back from work. But try not to be out of the house more that 8 hours because he has a schedule, he knows exactly when he is given food and when he will be walked. If you don’t impose him a rhythm, the dog will be stressed and the house a mess.

Never leave the dog alone when you are planning to go on a trip or on a vacation. If possible take him with you or if not, hire someone or ask some friends to take care of him.

It is important to make it up to your dog. If you have to leave him alone a lot during work days, try and spend more time with him on weekends and holidays. Behavior issues can be easily corrected if you just play more with the dog.